‘A managing director in his early 30’s attended an Ultimate Assessment in general good health… an MRI scan of his abdomen revealed a large mass in his pancreas. He was referred to a pancreatic surgeon for further investigation where it was decided he should have the tumour surgically removed.’ 

A managing director in his early 30’s booked in for an Ultimate Assessment at Preventicum in general good health and with no symptoms. The assessment included an MRI scan of his abdomen which revealed a large mass in his pancreas. This mass looked benign on MRI scanning, but he was nevertheless urgently referred to see a pancreatic surgeon for further investigation.  The images were reviewed at a multidisciplinary team meeting attended by doctors from various specialities and it was decided that he should have an ultrasound-guided biopsy. The histology came back suggestive of a neuroendocrine tumour. There was no evidence of malignancy, but as neuroendocrine tumours do have a propensity to turn malignant particularly when larger, it was decided that he should have his tumour surgically removed.  He then underwent a removal of part of his pancreas and his spleen. Histology confirmed the tumour to be a solid, very rare type of pancreatic tumour even rarer in men. It predominantly occurs in young females in their 30s and accounts for about 1% of all tumours of the pancreas. It is a very uncommon tumour, but has an excellent survival. They have been known to spread, but a cure is normally achieved if the disease is confined to the pancreas at diagnosis.  This was a very interesting case because the tumour was benign at diagnosis, but did have the potential to become malignant if left undetected in this very young man with no symptoms.